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News [NOV 08] We have our first three inmates to complete the fisrt phase of our drug and alcohol treatment program here at the jail. This program presents a 29-session treatment program designed to engage, motivate, and stimulate processes of change in clients at all stages of recovery. This program is highly engaging and effective and will strengthen the developement of critical skills needed for recovery. Seen above is Jailer Doyle Fox, Lonnie Bryant Jr, John Bland, Michael Hicks, and counselor Elliott Sewell.
   
News [NOV 08] ©WBKO Reporter Lacey Steele talked to Dora Bartley as they honor her as a Hometown Hero. Some people may be looking forward to retirement, but one local woman sees her job as both important and special. We met up with 90-year-old Dora Bartley in this week's Hometown Hero. Dora Bartley loves to cook. "I used to cook, fixing supper, and come in and fix breakfast, but now I just come in and fix one meal a day," said Dora. But she also loves the reason why she has remained as a cook at the Monroe County jail for 23 years. "I love to talk," said Dora. "I love people. I love to be with people. That's why I'm down here." "She's just a remarkable lady," said Doyle Fox, the Monroe County Jailer. "She's worked here at this jail, she says, for 23 years, and I think the whole community deserves her for Hometown Hero." Throughout her life Dora has had five daughters and two sons. She has also worked at a factory, the sheriff's office, and even lived at the jail during part of the time her husband was jailer from 1966-1970. She's made many friends, and her family says they're proud. Dora always loves to tell her favorite stories from her past, especially about growing up riding horses. "I've put a lot of shoes on horses, but we rode them all the time," said Dora. "That's the only way we had to go. Walk or ride horses." When she isn't working, she still tries to keep busy. "I've quilted the last two months," said Dora. "I've pieced and quilted five quilts, and I've been peeling apples and drying them. I think I've dried about 18 gallons of dried apples, and I just keep busy."
CLICK HERE FOR THE WBKO© VIDEO
   
[JUL 08] We are now pleased to offer a Drug & Alcohol Treatment Program here at the jail for inmates. This practical program presents a 29-session treatment program designed to engage, motivate, and stimulate processes of change in clients at all stages of recovery. The program is based on the research-supported transtheoretical model of behavior change. This program is highly engaging and effective and will threngthen the developement of critical skills needed for recovery. The advantage of the program is that each session can stand alone, allowing treatment to be customized for different individuals. Elliott B Sewell will be the counselor of the classes. He is board certified with the Kentucky Professional Counselors and the National Board For Certified Counselors, also the Kentucky Mental Health Counselors Association. Elliott has also recently taught graduate level courses in Mental Health Counseling at Western Kentucky University, Sociology at Tennessee Tech and also Nashville State Community College.
   
[JUN 08] The GED tests general academic skills and core content that are covered in four years of high school. Each year hundreds of thousands of people earn their GED diplomas, which they use to get jobs, earn promotions, or qualify for higher education or training. This is one of our inmate programs offered here. We had another GED recipient this month. Seen above is John Bland with his diploma and instructor Sandy Moore.
   
[APR 08] The GED tests general academic skills and core content that are covered in four years of high school. Each year hundreds of thousands of people earn their GED diplomas, which they use to get jobs, earn promotions, or qualify for higher education or training. This is one of our inmate programs offered here. We had another GED recipient this month. Seen above is Timothy Curtis with his diploma and instructor Sandy Moore.
   
[MAR 08] Spring has arrived in Monroe County. Jailer Doyle Fox has arranged for inmates to be out with the County Road Dept workers to clean up the highways in our area. They will be out cleaning up trash on all highways this month. The first week they were out working they have bagged almost 300 bags of roadside trash. Please be careful when driving through the worksite areas.
   
[FEB 08] Sheila Fox along with other area jail's staff traveled to Eddyville Kentucky for a week long course on training jail deputies (Train The Trainer) at the Western Regional Training Center. This will save on costs from our staff that go for their yearly 16 hour Department Of Corrections training. They can now be trained here locally.
   
[FEB 08] Kentucky's state inmate population grew faster than anywhere else in the nation last year, swelling to 22,402 prisoners. Kentucky's 12% jump reflects the trend of a nation that has more prisoners than any other country and where one of every 100 adults is incarcerated, the report shows. The report says 2,319,258 people are in jails and prisons nationwide. The increases are doing little to decrease crime, the study says, but are having an impact on tight budgets in states such as Kentucky, which spent $454 million on corrections in 2007. Indiana, which had a relatively small 0.6% increase in prison population, spent almost $650 million on corrections. And the outlook is for more increases in Kentucky. In Kentucky, attention has been drawn to the issue of prison and jail populations, both statewide and locally. The increase in spending is fueled not only by the increase in the number of inmates, but also by the rising costs of incarceration - including costs of medical care for an aging inmate population and use of overtime spending to pay for officers because of staffing shortages. While violent offenders account for some of the growth in inmate population, much of the growth is from low-level offenders or people who have violated their probation or parole.
   
[JAN 08] The GED tests general academic skills and core content that are covered in four years of high school. Each year hundreds of thousands of people earn their GED diplomas, which they use to get jobs, earn promotions, or qualify for higher education or training. This is one of our inmate programs offered here. We had another GED recipient this month. Seen above is Jimmy Bow with his diploma and instructor Sandy Moore.
   

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